Community-Based Support Team

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Many patients with ADHD work with a team of health care professionals, social workers, and other community-based professionals to manage their ADHD. Review the health care team members below to learn more about their roles in ADHD management.

Family doctors, pediatricians, neurologists

  • Diagnosis1-2
  • Prescribing and managing medicine3

Psychiatrists

  • Diagnosis1-2
  • Prescribing and managing medicine3
  • Behavior therapy4

Clinical Psychologists

  • Diagnosis1-2
  • Behavior therapy4
  • Other psychotherapy methods5
  • Teaching students with ADHD skills they can use to manage daily tasks6

Neuropsychologists

  • Diagnosis7
  • Behavior therapy7

Licensed mental health counselors, licensed marriage and family counselors

  • Refer for diagnosis8
  • Other psychotherapy8

Clinical social workers

  • Teaching students with ADHD skills they can use to manage daily tasks6

Occupational therapists

  • Assessing how students use their senses (eg, sight, hearing, touch) to organize and respond to information5
  • Implementing therapy centered on using the senses5

ADHD coaches

  • Teaching students with ADHD skills they can use to help manage daily tasks9-10

Of course, parents, spouses, and other caregivers may also play an important role in the management of patients with ADHD.11-12 Ongoing communication among all involved is required to develop and implement the management plan, as well as monitor the patient's progress and the effectiveness of the plan.13

References

  1. National Resource Center on AD/HD. What We Know #1: The Disorder Named ADHD. Landover, MD: Children and Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder; 2008. help4adhd.org/documents/WWK1.pdf. Published 2004. Updated February 2008. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  2. Rief SF. How to Reach and Teach Children With ADD/ADHD. 2nd ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 2005.
  3. Pfiffner LJ. All About ADHD: The Complete Practical Guide for Classroom Teachers. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc; 2011.
  4. National Resource Center on AD/HD. What We Know #7: Psychosocial Treatments for Children and Adolescents With AD/HD. Landover, MD: Children and Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder; 2004. help4adhd.org/documents/WWK7.pdf. Updated February 2004. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  5. Chu S, Reynolds F. Occupational therapy for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), part 1: a delineation model of practice. Br J Occup Ther. 2007;70(9):372-383.
  6. Quinn PO, Stern JM. The New Putting on the Brakes: Understanding and Taking Control of Your ADD or ADHD. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: Magination Press; 2009.
  7. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. (DSM-5®). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing; 2013.
  8. American Mental Health Counselors Association. Facts about clinical mental health counselors. American Mental Health Counselors Association website. amhca.org/about/facts.aspx. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  9. National Resource Center on AD/HD. What We Know #18: Coaching for Adults With AD/HD. Landover, MD: Children and Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder; 2003. help4adhd.org/documents/WWK18.pdf. Published December 2003. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  10. Sleeper-Triplett J. Empowering Youth With ADHD. Plantation, FL: Specialty Press, Inc; 2010.
  11. Murphy K, Adler LA. Assessing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults: focus on rating scales. J Clin Psychiatry. 2004;65(suppl 3):12-17.
  12. Murphy K. Psychosocial treatments for ADHD in teens and adults: a practice-friendly review. J Clin Psychol. 2005;61(5):607-619.
  13. Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management. ADHD: clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2011:128(5):1007-1022, SI1-SI21.