School Support Teams

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Partnering with teachers and other school support team members can be a great way to help your child with ADHD.

Principals and other administrators

  • Approving requests for evaluations for additional support for children with ADHD
  • Helping set up additional support
  • Collaborating with teachers and other school support team members to ensure they have what they need to provide additional support

Teachers

  • Helping set up additional support for children with ADHD
  • Providing additional support
  • Reporting on progress

School psychologists

  • Assessing and evaluating behavior
  • Helping provide additional support for children with ADHD
  • Addressing behavior issues
  • Teaching children with ADHD skills they can use to manage daily tasks

School-based occupational therapists

  • Assessing how children use their senses (eg, sight, hearing, touch) to organize and respond to information
  • Using therapy centered on using the senses

School nurses

  • If a child is prescribed medication for ADHD, giving the child medication exactly as the doctor tells him or her to take it
  • Keeping parents/caregivers, teachers, other school support team members, and community-based support team members informed about children's responses to medication in the school setting

Case managers

  • Coordinating additional support for children who are receiving help from several support team members in school and/or in the community

Guidance counselors

  • Helping provide additional support for children with ADHD
  • Assisting with college and career planning

Social workers

  • Helping provide additional support for children with ADHD

Building Partnerships

Taking some simple steps may promote helpful communication and help you "start off on the right foot" with the school support team.

Steps to Promote Helpful Communication

  1. Ask your child's school support team how they like to keep in touch (eg, by phone, e-mail, or meeting in person).
  2. Decide how often you will touch base with each other.
  3. Make sure that everyone knows which symptoms your child needs most help with on a day-to-day basis.
  4. Focus on goals and progress.
  5. Let them know that you support and value their efforts to help.
  6. Do your best to maintain positive, open communication.

Sometimes, the need to connect with your child's school support team may come up unexpectedly. When this happens, talk to these support team members right away to prevent small issues from turning into big ones.

It is especially important to let your child's teachers know that you value them. Simple things, such as thank you notes, may help let them know that you are grateful for their help.

If you decide you would like your child's school support team members to speak with members of your child's community-based support team, you may need to provide them with written permission to do so. If you do not do this, they may not be allowed to speak with one another about your child.